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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
america are movies, tv, science, technology. they're not keen on democracy as america preaches it. heading into another four years of the obama administration, where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? what went wrong, what is going right, and what to do about it going forward? >> first of all, i do not think that favorability ratings and the pew surveys of evidence of whether we're doing something wrong or right. i think it is a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. well i guess maybe some of us who were in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure in effect in 2008, the favorability ratings for the united states were higher in four out of the five surveyed arab countries -- i am not even going to bring that up. [laughter] and it is a big mistake. in my view, and what i tried to do during my short tenure as undersecretary, is try to focus attention on what public diplomacy can do to achieve specific ends that are part of their goals in foreign policy and national security po
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are shifting from her politics and diplomacy and rely on tools of solutions. >> is the war on terror divided into a problem rather than addressing the more fundamental issues that might have led to the spread in popularity of chiapas in the first place? >> i certainly think the footprint strategy is intended to do exactly what the questioner is suggesting here, which is simply one of containment, but to do without sending in 100,000 troops and accepting a chilling doublers along the way. but you think about the american reaction to 9/11, 9/11 cost the attackers may be have been dollars of "the new york times" went about trying to do an assessment at the 10 year anniversary of what we spend in total in reaction to 9/11. everything from rebuilding the buildings to the wars in afghanistan and iraq to homeland security and so forth. the number we came up with was $3.3 trillion i
of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
be a light footprint with technological containment of the problem. when i hear $3.3 trillion, i hear the bulk of it is because of what happened on 9/11. my question is, in the new normal, what is the role for militant extremism? is it releasing them from jail and giving them a space and controlling them technologically? thank you. >> i will star with the last. if you think the light footprint strategy is all about containment, then it does raise the question of what are the limits of light footprint? what have we discovered it does not do terribly well? it does not build justice or build the kind of global development that paula was discussing before. it deliberately pulls the united states back from a kind of the engagement that we thought in the post-cold war world that we were heading into. and frankly, you might of thought we were heading into it just listening to president obama during the 2008 campaign when he talked mostly about engagement strategy. we did not hear a lot of discussion about what we have all been talking about here today. i think the fact that we have seen the
. if you talk to some very high technology firms, they will say, sorry, we cannot find enough specialized mathematician's or specialized engineers or an agricultural worker will say we have 7.9% unemployment but i cannot find enough people to help me take care of my harvest. we have 7.9% unemployment, but we do not have enough people in the transportation and logistics arena. perhaps high school kids -- high-school graduates do not want to be truckdrivers these days. they do not want to go back to the farm. it is not totally even. there is evidence that suggests very strongly that immigrants actually take up the slack. they do not compete necessarily with jobs already taken. another of many advantages of legalizing is that wages will have to go up. they will have to formally pay taxes, formally pays social security. the system will be level. there is one thing you said that i think at the core of this. i think it is and a wonderful insight. as the government is getting larger -- and the government is getting larger. the government has grown a four percentage points of gdp in the last four
and oranges to a certain extent. the drone, i think, as chris said is yes it's a new technology. relatively new technology. but it's used for an old purpose. that purpose is assassination. the question -- >> for me at least as a lawyer, how the legality of carrying out these assassinations. it's one thing to cite young awlaki but he was killed in a successful attempt to kill his father, also an american citizen. >> he was already -- >> two american citizens, for whom capital punishment was carried out. >> without due process. >> without due process. when a young man is killed in his bathroom in the bronx, you can hold people accountable. that's generally not due to an order from above or from the police chief. >> that was the story in the u.s. that was the thing that we had -- that we as a nation said this is unacceptable. >> let me say this. >> i'm sorry. this guy authorized the killing of other americans. it's treason. >> we're going to take a quick break. when we come back, a bit more on this question but also on the issue of benghazi. the potentiao more in business. by earning a degree
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)